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to thousands more people across the UK
With your help, we can bring the joy of live music to thousands more people across the UK

Hospice patients compose and record a song for Queen’s Platinum Jubilee

Previously published in Kent Online.

Live Music Now musicians are working with hospice patients to professionally record a song to perform as part of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations.

Northfleet-based ellenor received funding from Arts Council’s Let’s Create Jubilee Fund in conjunction with Kent Community Foundation to deliver the tune for Her Majesty.

ellenor patients based at Gravesend practice the song they are recording for the Queen

ellenor, which looks after looks after adults and children across Dartford, Gravesham and Swanley, will use the grant to work in collaboration with music charity Live Music Now to help patients write, compose and create a celebratory song.

Patients will perform the final composition with the support of musicians at ellenor’s Jubilee garden party on June 1.

The song will also be professionally recorded and the hospice will create a video to accompany the music.

Andrew Lowden, Operational Wellbeing lead at ellenor said inspiration for the track will be found in the example set by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

Speaking during a practice session, he said: “Having worked closely with some of the talented musicians at Live Music Now this year, we are looking forward to coming together to create this song.

Performers from the Live Music Now scheme are working with ellenor to compsoe the track. Photo: ellenor (56514912)
Performers from the Live Music Now scheme are working with ellenor to compose the track. Photo: ellenor (56514912)

“The Queen has been such an inspiration for so many of us and given her passion for music it feels fitting that we should acknowledge her in this way.

“It is also an opportunity to show that hospices are vibrant, energetic and fun places to spend time, breaking some of the stigma that surrounds them, whilst giving our patients a unique opportunity to be part of something special.”

Direction for the composition is being provided by experienced musicians who will work with patients on the song over the next month.

Clinical research shows that engaging with live music provides significant benefits to people’s health and wellbeing.

Live Music Now works alongside hospices, care homes and day centres to co-create programmes bringing live sound back into peoples’ lives, through concerts and residencies with trained musicians.

Last week musicians Elliott Morris, 32, and Henry Webster, 30, lent their talents to the track alongside ellenor patients at the hospice in Coldharbour Road.

Live Music Now performers Henry Webster, left, and Elliott Morris, right, have been lending their musical talents to the track. Photo: Sean Delaney
Live Music Now performers Henry Webster, left, and Elliott Morris, right, have been lending their musical talents to the track. Photo: Sean Delaney

Over the last two weeks they’ve already put together lyrics, a melody and even penned a chorus.

Elliott said: “It is amazing we have really felt the energy from people. Since the first day everyone has taken to it.”

The final song will not only allow ellenor to look back at this event in years to come, but also produce a lasting memory for families of those patients involved.